Now that I have your attention…I am sure this title has you intrigued.  Sounds like some war on morality? Nope. Not even close.

 

So what am I talking about? What I am talking about is taking care of your personal finances.  And not waiting until you walk down the aisle to address your financial future.

 

You see, when I was in my 20s, I had this crazy notion in the back of my head that I didn’t need to be completely serious about my finances until I was married.  My thinking was that I didn’t want to start planning my finances around being single only to have that plan changed if and when I met the man of my dreams.

 

When I was 22 years old, getting married within five to seven years didn’t seem too far-fetched as the average age for American women today to get married for the first time is 27 years old.  On the other hand, think of all that time that could be used to hone your financial skills and to begin building your financial nest egg. That means, on average, that you have almost ten years of your adult life to manage finances on your own.  Ten years!  That’s a lot of time to start building retirement or paying off debt or investing in real estate.

 

Let’s also not diminish the fact that bringing good personal finance habits into a marriage is very important. Starting off a marriage with knowledge about how money works is key to help build a great relationship.  And besides the awesome amazing woman that you are that your future husband gets to marry, what a fantastic bonus that you also bring financial responsibility and knowledge to the table.  It takes the pressure off of him to carry the enormous burden of the finances and shows him that you are a capable woman – not some princess that needs to be held by the hand.

 

And what about the other elephant in the room?  What happens if marriage comes much later in life or, perhaps, doesn’t become part of the life plan? Being in my late 30s, I am SO glad I didn’t wait much longer to start addressing my financial situation.  I can only imagine what my finances would have looked like now – deeper in debt, no savings for emergencies, no deliberate plan for my future. And the dreams of the the things I want to accomplish and the people I want to help could have never happened.

 

Don’t sell yourself short when it comes to your finances.  You are so much more capable to take charge of this area of your life than you give yourself credit. And I don’t want you to waste the years that I did hinging all my financial bets on an event in my life that may or may not happen.  You are in charge of your financial future so start making it a priority in your life – wherever that road may lead you!